Horticulture Economics

Since 1990, Dr. Benedict C. Posadas has consistently developed and maintained the Mississippi State University (MSU), Coastal Research and Extension Center’s (CREC) extension and research (R&E) program in economics with an emphasis on the following major areas.

The choice of the R&E focus areas was motivated by the information needs of the coastal communities and residents, marine, horticultural and coastal-related industries, business establishments and organizations, and state and federal regulatory agencies. The specific mandates of the state and federal funding initiatives dictated some of the directions of R&E programming efforts.

The CREC’s horticulture and marine resource economics (HMRE) extension and research programs during the past one and one-half decades were made possible by additional extramural funding from state and federal funding agencies totaling more than five million dollars. Several requests of regional, national and international agencies and media organizations to participate in committees, workshops, conferences, collaborative efforts, and press releases demonstrate the extent of the usefulness and recognition of the HMRE programs conducted by Dr. Posadas.

HORTICULTURE

Economic Impacts of Horticulture Research, 2017-2021:

This project will assess the economic impacts of the research and extension program on ornamental horticulture, vegetables, fruits, and nuts at the Mississippi State University (MSU) - Coastal Research and Extension Center (CREC). The specific objectives are as follows: develop a systematic methodology in assessing the economic impact of the research and extension program, and estimate the economic impacts of the research and extension program. Dr. Posadas is working with several horticulturists at CREC and USDA. This work is supported in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Hatch project under accession number 232036.

The horticulture publications and presentations of Dr. Posadas are listed in http://coastal.msstate.edu/ben-publications and http://coastal.msstate.edu/horticulture-presentations

 

Consumer Survey of Wreath Designs, 2016-2021:  

A series of decorative wreaths using Mississippi-grown plant materials were devised, designed and photographed on Oct. 11, 2016. A survey of 347 respondents was conducted from Oct. 2016 to Oct. 2017 in Mississippi to better understand the markets for wreath designs by local florists.

The results of this study provide wreath or floral designs opportunities for local horticulture growers. Many farmers seek alternative crops and value-added products, particularly during the off-season. Value-added products can be manufactured and marketed from farms already producing these materials. Magnolia and Pinus are native plants and are abundant on farms.

The results of the survey also encourage more research and extension programming with the local horticulture industry. Producers seeking alternative crops are informed about cut ornamental floral materials and their uses.

The horticulture publications and presentations of Dr. Posadas are listed in http://coastal.msstate.edu/ben-publications and http://coastal.msstate.edu/horticulture-presentations

 

Labor Management Practices and Mechanization in the Horticulture Industry, 2010-2021
http://coastal.msstate.edu/horticulture-economics

Using a socioeconomic database collected by face-to-face interviews of 215 nurseries and greenhouses, empirical models were estimated to measure the economic impacts of mechanization or automation on annual gross sales, yearly employment, and workers earnings, safety, and retention. 

Dr. Posadas completed several publications covering socioeconomic characteristics of workers and their working conditions and owners and operators, socioeconomic determinants of technology adoption, operational characteristics of greenhouses and nurseries, socioeconomic impacts of mechanization and automation, and current mechanization systems.

The Multi-State Project S-1065 provided partial funding for this horticulture economics project. Dr. Posadas devotes 10 percent (4 hr/wk on Monday) of this time to perform the tasks outlined in the project proposal starting on Oct. 1, 2016.

The horticulture publications and presentations of Dr. Posadas are listed in http://coastal.msstate.edu/ben-publications and http://coastal.msstate.edu/horticulture-presentations

 

Socioeconomic Impacts of Nursery/Greenhouse Mechanization/Automation – 2003-2009: http://coastal.msstate.edu/socio-economic-impact

In collaboration with ornamental horticulturists, Dr. Posadas conducted a socioeconomic survey of nursery and greenhouse automation and mechanization as part of a research program undertaken by the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station and the U.S. Department of Labor entitled “Enhancing Labor Performance of the Green Industry in the Gulf South.”

The 10-page socioeconomic survey consists of eight parts, namely: workers’ demographic characteristics, nursery characteristics, nursery mechanization, greenhouse automation, labor and capital markets, pesticide and chemicals, working conditions, and respondents’ characteristics. The overall goals of the regional socioeconomic survey are to develop a socioeconomic profile of horticulture workers and to evaluate the impact of automation on their employment, earnings, safety, skill-levels, and retention rates. The U.S. Department of Labor funded this research project from 2003 to 2009.

The horticulture publications and presentations of Dr. Posadas are listed in http://coastal.msstate.edu/ben-publications and http://coastal.msstate.edu/horticulture-presentations